2008 Hurricane Season Information – Tropical Storm Arthur

by June 2, 2008 • 5 comments

As the 2008 hurricane season begins, pcbdaily will provide updates as often as relevant to help keep everyone abreast of the storms brewing and how they will affect our area in Panama City Beach.

Currently Arthur is out there, but it as been downgraded to a Tropical Depression from its recent upgrade to a tropical storm. The current location is over southeast Mexico on the Yucatan Peninsula. Winds are at 30mph, pressure is at 1006mb, and the storm is moving at 6 mph, SW.

For all names storms and a whole preparedness checklist, check after the break.

The 2008 Atlantic Storm Names are as follows:

  1. Arthur
  2. Bertha
  3. Cristobal
  4. Dolly
  5. Edouard
  6. Fay
  7. Gustav
  8. Hanna
  9. Ike
  10. Josephine
  11. Kyle
  12. Laura
  13. Marco
  14. Nana
  15. Omar
  16. Paloma
  17. Rene
  18. Sally
  19. Teddy
  20. Vicky
  21. Wilfred

What hurricane-force winds are like

Hurricane Preparedness

  • Developing a family plan
    • Know your homes vulnerability and how these types of hazards could affect your family
    • Locate a safe room in your home that will offer the most protection in the event of a hurricane. If your home doesn’t seem to have a safe room, locate a safe place to go in your community.
    • Be sure you know the escape routes and the easiest/quickest way to get to them from your home.
    • Organize a place to meet should you get separated during evacuation.
    • Be sure to arrange an out of state family contact so that all family members have a single point of contact.
    • Post emergency phone numbers by the phone and be sure your kids know how to call 911.
    • Check all insurance coverage to be sure you are covered for everything, ESPECIALLY FLOOD INSURANCE
  • Have a Disaster Supply Kit that contains:
    • Water – at least 1 gallon per day per person for 7 days
    • Foot – at least enough for 7 days, should be non perishable including package and canned foods, don’t forget about food for your young and old people, snack foods, non-electric can opener (duh!), cooking tools (charcoal, propane, matches, lighters, etc.), paper/plastic plates, plastic utensils
    • Blankets and pillows
    • Clean clothes, rain gear, sturdy shoes
    • First aid kit, good stock of all medicines and prescription drugs
    • Any special items for your old and young people
    • TOILET PAPER – you’ll be amazed at how much you’ll miss this when it is all gone, other toiletries, personal hygiene items, moisture wipes (these are not that expensive and go a long way)
    • Plenty of flashlights, batteries, candles, lighters, matches (waterproof)
    • Battery operated radio
    • Telephones – be sure your cell phones stay charged when a hurricane is coming and keep extra batteries handy if possible. Also be sure to keep one of those old phones that you actually plug into the wall handy. Remember those? The ones that do not require a power cord? If your power goes out, sometimes the phone lines will still work.
    • CASH – no power means the atm won’t work, nor will the credit card machines. Be sure to keep a good assortment of small and large bills.
    • Keys – be sure you know where all the keys for all your cars, homes, storage, locks, etc. in a place that is safe and easy to find (if not in your pocket).
    • Toys, books, games – it can be real boring waiting for help to come.
    • Important documents – be sure they are kept in a waterproof container. These include your social security cards, medical records, insurance documents, bank account numbers, checks, etc.
    • Tools – keep the basics in an easy to carry tool box. Should include a hammer, a couple sets of pliers, a saw, a hatchet, adjustable wrench, socket kit, small assortment of screwdrivers, drill, drill bits, etc.
    • Be sure to keep your vehicle fuel tanks full and keep a few extra cans of gas in storage that you cycle through.
    • All pet care items – proper identification, immunization records, medications, plenty of food and water, a carrier or cage, and a muzzle and leash
  • Prepare your home
    • Purchase a couple of water storage containers, such as the waterbob to line your bathtubs and fill with water. Something like this should be less than $50.
    • Put up plywood or storm shudders over windows
    • Turn off all electrical appliances, shut off main power
    • keep plenty of water containers in freezer as they’ll help keep things cool longer. Don’t open the refrigerator or freezer.
    • Close all curtains and blinds and cover furniture with plastic. Move furniture away from windows.
    • Bring all loose items inside.

As we move through the season, hopefully it will be as uneventful as the last two years, but in the event that it is not, I’ll be posting multiple updates each day as we track a system that may threaten us.

Below are some useful links for reference.

Info on hurricane preparedness week

Weather Channel’s Hurricane Central

FloridaDisaster.org

National Hurricane Center

Florida Weather Alerts

Prevent illness and injury during a storm

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Additional Hurricanes Stories

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1 Ken October 1, 2008 at 1:42 am

HELLO, ARE YOU STILL THERE??? This story was in June of this year. With Ike having now helped to destroy half the southern continental united state I hope the other 11 storms that are left will at least leave a small portion of the northern states.
I hope the writer of this article is still alive and not washed into the sea or something.
11 or so storms left.
combined with the effects of pollution and Global warming people better be in the local baptist church or evangelical church every week praying for thier lives.

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